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08/Dec/2022

We all know how the immune system plays a role in colds and flu. Our bodies use it to fight viruses and bacteria. But how does it affect allergies? Here is a look at the link between allergies and immune health, along with some tips how to boost immune system. As a body’s army, the immune system’s primary job is to keep us healthy and free from disease. So, immune systems are very complex. This includes the hairs on your nose, the stomach acid that kills bacteria, and the digestive system in which immune cells gather. If Once pathogens pass through the body’s many frontline defenses (e.g. skin, hair, stomach acid), a response occurs, in which immune cells attack the pathogens and kill them. This usually results in cold or flu symptoms.

How to Boost Immune System to Fight Allergies

In what sense does the immune system function?

Symptoms of the common cold and flusymptoms of allergiesIt is both.
Neck lymph nodes swelledAn itchy skin conditionA blocked or runny nose
Having a feverEye irritationCough
Aches and pains in muscles and joints Weakness
  A sneeze
  Sore throat

During an allergic reaction, how does the immune system react?

If Whenever you experience allergy symptoms like coughing or sneezing, it is likely that your immune system is at the root of the problem. Symptoms such as these can be caused by hypersensitive immune systems that react to harmless substances. The immune system, made up of mast cells, has an important role to play in fighting infection. However, the best way to fight allergies is to boost the immune system. A mast cell detects an allergen by releasing histamine and other chemicals into the bloodstream. A runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing, coughing, swelling, rashes, irritated skin, and redness are all allergy symptoms caused by histamine. Patients are usually treated with antihistamines to prevent mast cells from being overactivated and producing too much histamine.

Is allergic reaction a sign that the immune system is weakened?

Allergy symptoms suggest a system that is reacting out of proportion to the threat it faces; however, this does not necessarily imply a weak immune system. The immune system’s reaction would be more appropriately described as abnormal. Having healthy and strong immunity is crucial when fighting allergy symptoms. You might experience allergy symptoms for longer than usual if your immune system is weak.

Is there a way for me to strengthen my immune system against allergies?

The immune system and allergies are closely related, so it makes sense to take care of your immune system if you want to manage allergies well. But, let’s go over my best tips for managing allergies.

  • Vitamin C! 

This nutrient is an ally of the immune system, supporting the production of white blood cells that fight infection. So, you can also try a blueberry banana smoothie or carrot ginger soup for added vitamins!

  • Stay hydrated.

 Most of us know that water is good for health in various ways, but are you aware that it is also good for the immune system? Supporting the immune system’s communication and biochemical pathways may be made easier by proper hydration.

  • Stress-relief. 

In addition to suppressing our bodies’ immune response, prolonged stress has been shown to have even more damaging effects. Even 70% of the immune system can be suppressed by chronic stress! 

  • Examine your diet. 

A variety of foods plays a crucial role in boosting immunity, and this has long been established. When meal planning, think about color and variety. Beige will not do anything for you!

  • Maintain a healthy digestive system. 

Because most immune cells live in the gut, it makes sense to keep it healthy. Gut bacteria aid digestion. You may consider taking a probiotic.

  • Consider taking a supplement. 

Many products are available on the market, but Immune Support stands out because it contains zinc, vitamin D, and nasturtium.

More to come! Introducing our A-Z guide to supporting your immune system by Dr. Sheetu Singh


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08/Dec/2022

Haemophilus influenza: characteristics, culture, pathogenesis, treatment

Haemophilus influenza is a Gram-negative, Plumorphic coccobacillus, which causes a variety of infections and some serious infections, including meningitis, septicemia, pneumonia, epiglottis, conjunctivitis, cellulitis, or arthritis. The Types and Evaluation of Influenza species represents the main pathogen of this genus. Children and the elderly are the most susceptible to serious infections caused by these microorganisms. The former suffered mostly from meningitis and later from pneumonia.

Some strains are Haemophilus influenza they are bound and others are not. Capsules are typeable according to the type of carbohydrate in the capsule. The types described by A, B, C, D, E, and F are known as different types.

Types and Evaluation of Influenza

At the laboratory level, these can be isolated with polysaccharides using antisera aggregating antibodies.

Capsulated strains are pathogenic. Type B These are the most invasive and frequently isolated in the infectious process. Non-capsulated is considered habitual microbiota and although they may be contagious, they are not usually invasive and do not represent a greater risk.

They are difficult to distinguish at the laboratory level, as they require highly enriched media for optimal development, such as chocolate agar or lethal agar.

This is why these microorganisms fall into the group of bacteria that claim to be from a nutritional point of view, although some authors prefer to call them annoying microorganisms.

Disease (pathogenesis)

These are transmitted by microbial secretions, mainly respiratory problems (saliva and mucus) excreted by sick people or carriers of bacteria.

If the patient sneezes or coughs, the bacteria are excreted in the excreta. Bacteria are spread in the environment and are inhaled by sensitive individuals.

Haemophilus influenza is a pyogenic microorganism that causes it to produce purulent secretions.

Its main pathologies are meningitis, septicemia, pneumonia, epiglottitis, conjunctivitis, and otitis, among others. Here are given different types of disease –

SepticemiaWhen bacteria enter the bloodstream it is called bacteremia and is an important step in the spread of microorganisms to other organs or tissues. When the number of microorganisms in the blood multiplies, it is called septicemia, a condition that compromises the patient’s general condition.

  1. Meningitis

Meningitis is a serious disease that causes neck, headaches, nausea, or changes in behavior and some cases leads to death. This infection is common in children.

  1. Pneumonia

It is presented as a serious complication of a previous respiratory tract infection such as bronchitis or acute fibrillar tracheobronchitis. It presents with a high fever, dyspnea, or productive cough with cauliflower chin. It can coexist with bacteremia. This involvement is more common in older adults.

  1. Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis presents redness, burning, swelling of the eyelids, presence of purulent discharge, or sensitivity to light (photophobia).

Diagnosis

Culture is the best way to diagnose. Samples will depend on the infectious process.

If meningoencephalitis is suspected, a sample of cerebrospinal fluid should be taken by a lumbar puncture for cytochemical study and culture. In case of septicemia, blood samples will be taken to perform multiple blood cultures.

If the process is conjunctivitis, the secretion of this mucus will be taken. In the case of pneumonia, a specimen of sputum or bronchial lavage is cultured.

Detection can also be done using manual biochemical tests or by automated systems such as VTech2.

Treatment

Types and Evaluation of Influenza Haemophilus  It can be treated with beta-lactam like ampicillin, ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin / clavulanic acid, piperacillin/tazobactam. Third-generation cephalosporins, such as ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, and cefoperazone, are often used in severe infections.

It is important to note that ampicillin is no longer used because most isolated strains are currently resistant to this antibiotic, due to the production of beta-lactamase.

Macrolides and quinolones can be used.

However, the most advisable issue is to administer and treat antibiotics according to the sensitivity of the report.

Resistance

Type Haemophilus influenza E B after the introduction of the vaccine against it, this microbial cause has significantly reduced the incidence of meningitis.

Currently, capsular antigen type B (polydipsia-ribitol-phosphate) H. Influenza is included in the pentavalent vaccine which also fights against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, and hepatitis B.

The vaccine is given in 3 or 4 doses. The 4-dose schedule is as follows:

The first dose is started at 2 months of age. Two more doses are then given every two months (at ages 4 and 6 months). Finally, the fourth dose is placed 6 or 9 months after the third. The last dose represents a boost.


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